Why Would Anyone Become an Artist?

There is an online website where in you can create your own concept boards, this is how I find comfort using this website. The contemporary artist faces daunting odds of ever attaining large recognition or monetary success. This is just a fact of the world we live in. Art jobs do not, generally, pay high salaries, and the independent artist is almost guaranteed to suffer economic shortfalls. Even artists who are selling their work and gaining recognition tend to suffer. Society does not see the independent artist as worthy of great incomes. The artist is not considered as important as a doctor or lawyer or even a garbage worker. After all, garbage workers make comfortable professional level salaries. In our society, we pay individuals based upon the respect we have for them and the level of importance we attribute to their work. This means artists are not considered vital.

Of course this is not true of all artists. There will always be a handful of living artists for whom we attribute great value and respect along with financial rewards. These artists will be promoted by the institutions created for the exaltation of art, and their work will become a part of our social consciousness. It is not these artists that I am discussing, but rather the millions of independent artists, (musicians, writers, performers, painters, sculptures, etc.) who will live and die in anonymity.

So facing these odds, why on earth would anyone become an artist? If you are a parent and your child told you they wanted to be an artist, how would you react? Likely, you would say something to the affect that, while it is nice to make art, it is not a good career choice. You would probably gently encourage them to take some art courses, but stay focused on getting into law school. I can just hear these conversations taking place all over the world. A similar conversation took place between me and my parents when I told them I was going to major in art, so I speak from experience.

Yet, the very expensive art schools are full of students eager to take on art as a lifelong career. Every major university in America has an art department and art majors, as well as music departments, writing departments, and drama departments. Presumably, those students graduate and move on into the world as artists. At least for a time, for many of them do eventually succumb to the realities of our culture and take on more profitable professions. Still, they carry with them their art education, and I am certain that education supports their life choices and well being.

Art, you see, is a calling. It beckons one to follow it, and it does not know of the economic conditions of our time. Art knows only that it is irrevocably fixed to the human spirit. According to the philosopher Jean Luc Nancy, “beauty is the radiance of the true” (1.) In his essay, Nancy refers to art as the expression of beauty and hence the embodiment of the true. This truth, is the truth that Aristotle spoke of and is the essence of what is good and meaningful for humanity. It is what all humans should reach for in terms of their lives. This is why art calls to certain people, for it is a calling towards the radiance of the true, and it is essential to mankind.

Look back on the history of the human race and you will see this is so. The cave paintings at Lascaux were made between 15,000 – 13,000 BCE. Older cave paintings date back to 30,000 BCE. The paintings at Lascaux are huge and took many years to complete. Archeologists have discovered holes in the walls that they believe once held beams for scaffolding. They have also found old animal fat burning lamps and mixing bowels for pigments. All of which means these early artists required assistance. One artist would have had to have painted while others moved scaffolding, mixed pigments, kept the lamps burning, and gathered food. This is a lot of work considering the stark conditions of the time and the emphasis put on survival over culture. For some reason, these people felt that the making of art was as important as survival. They were willing to set aside precious energy and resources to engage in this activity of art making. There must have been some innate call within them to make these pictures, a need that went beyond the desire to decorate.

This is not the only time this has occurred. Again and again when humans find themselves in the worst conditions, they still manage to make art. During World War II art was made in the concentration camps and POW camps. Artists took bits of charcoal or a stub of pencil and created images. Some of them were made to document their suffering and others were made as a means of mental escape. These artists put themselves in terrible peril to make this art, and it took energy away from their strategies of survival.

One such artist was Benjamin Charles Steele (1917). Steele was stationed in the Philippines in WWII. He survived the Bataan death march as well as internment at Cabanatuan. (This was the largest POW camp on foreign soil; 9,000 people lived there; 3,000 Americans died there. The death rate was at 38%). Steele survived dysentery, pneumonia, blood poising, and forced labor. When assigned to the Tayabas Road Detail, Steele worked in the jungle without water or food and was the only one out of fifty people to survive. At some point, Steele began to make drawings of his fellow prisoners as an act of honor towards them. In her essay on Steele, author Penny Ronning states that “with no formal art training, Ben began to draw on whatever scraps of paper he could find images of what his eyes had seen and his mind worked overtime to process. These drawings were Ben’s way to honor his fallen comrades and record his experiences. At risk of death if discovered, Ben continued to pay tribute by secretly drawing the bravery of each soldier facing the most horrific of human cruelty. Sadly, all but two of Ben’s drawings were lost on a transport ship” (2)

Following Steele’s heroism, as well as the many other artists who have come before and after him, having been compelled to make art despite the circumstances; one must therefore, come to the conclusion that art is somehow linked to the most elemental parts of our humanity. It is linked in a way that goes deeper than societal conventions. It is rooted far down within our souls; down there with our instincts to survive, to procreate and to exist. It must be on the same level as the ant’s instinct to dig or the bee’s instinct to build honeycomb. The artist is compelled to examine his world and attempt to explain it through his unique vision and participation in life. As Carl Jung put it:

“Every creative person is a duality or a synthesis of contradictory aptitudes. On the one side he is a human being with a personal life, while on the other side he is an impersonal, creative process… The artist is not a person endowed with free will who seeks his own ends, but one who allows art to realize its purposes through him. As a human being he may have moods and a will and personal aims, but as an artist he is ‘man’ in a higher sense–he is ‘collective man’–one who carries and shapes the unconscious, psychic life of mankind. To perform this difficult office it is sometimes necessary for him to sacrifice happiness and everything that makes life worth living for the ordinary human being.” (3.)

So then, back to the initial question: why would anyone become an artist? Perhaps a better question might be, why would anyone try choose not to become an artist? It is a wonderful calling that goes well beyond the artist’s ability to make money or fit easily within societal conventions of success. It is a vital component of being fully human.

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Why You Need One for Your Catering Startup

Often the most stressful part of having a Sydney picnic spots is finding parking especially if more people also having their picnics. Are you wondering if you really need a business plan for your catering business? Perhaps you are thinking that as you only plan on starting a relatively small business it won’t really be necessary. Many people think like this and, of course, many people end up failing in their first year of business.

We highly recommend that you avoid becoming yet another business that underestimated costs or found that the market wasn’t ready for what they had to offer. Below we have outlined ten reasons why you must prepare a catering company business plan. We explain how if you do take the time to prepare a plan you will be increasing your chances of being successful with your catering startup.

1) Start in the Right Direction

Many entrepreneurs think that they can start out without doing a lot of planning and research. They feel that they can always pick up a feel for the business as they go. However, some of the early decisions that you make in the life of your business can be difficult to reverse at a later date. You need to have a clear path set out ahead of you so that you can make the right decisions about how to set up the business right from the start.

2) Reinforce Your Ideas

As you slowly get ideas about the catering company that you want to start you will find that these thoughts start floating around in your head. What you imagine yourself doing is often very different from what you are able to do realistically. Nothing is impossible but you just need to work out how to get there.

By putting your ideas down on paper you will be clarifying them in your mind. As you write you will find that you do additional brainstorming. You may get new ideas about what you want to do with your business and you may decide that some of the ideas that you had initially are not really feasible.

3) Figure Out How to Do It

Every entrepreneur has a very idealistic image in their mind of the kind of business that they want. Getting to that point is a process though and you need to work out a path to get there.

One great way to figure out how you will proceed is to first write down what you want to do. Next, write down as many questions as you can about how you are actually going to do it. These will include questions like ‘Will I do on-site or off-site catering?’, ‘How will I get access to kitchen facilities?’ or ‘How many catering jobs will I need to land each month to break even?’. As you slowly work out the answers to the problems that you come across you can write them down in the appropriate sections of your business plan.

4) Know Your Startup Requirements

When you prepare a business plan you will get an accurate idea of exactly what is needed before you launch the company. You will need to consider all of the things that you will need to pay for prior to opening such as catering equipment, initial advertising and so on. When you have calculated the total cost you will then know exactly how much money you need and can look at where this funding will come from.

5) Increase Personal Productivity

You have to be organized when you start a business. Rather than writing things down on loose scraps of paper and hoping for the best you need to have somewhere to compile all of the important data that you collect. A business plan is ideal for this purpose. If you store the business plan as a document on your PC you can simply add new information as you come across it. If you have done your research and have all of you information stored in one convenient location you will be more organized throughout your business launch and you will avoid a lot of unnecessary headaches.

6) Prove the Viability of Your Idea to Others

A business plan is a great way to prove to yourself that your ideas are viable and that the catering company that you are proposing can thrive and make a profit. You will also need a plan in order to prove to other people that the business model that you have in mind is financially sound. Think of your business plan as being like a resume that you can hand out to people who need information about your business. You can always leave out sections that are not relevant to the reader in question.

There are many people who may wish to view your business plan and you should keep them in mind as you put it together. If you are seeking funding then you may have to show the plan to prospective lenders or equity investors. As a caterer you will certainly have to comply with local health and hygiene requirements and these local authorities may expect to see a section in your plan relating to these areas. You may even need to show your business plan to the owner of any kitchen premises that you hope to lease before they agree to sign an agreement with you.

7) Set Goals and Objectives

A business plan is like a road map to success. Your goals are the destinations that you are aiming to get to. They should be fairly realistic and achievable but should also push you to work hard to reach them. You may set financial goals that set out what kind of gross or net monthly income you intend to be earning after your first year. Other goals could also refer to other metrics such as average food cost percentages on catering jobs for example.

8) Identify Weaknesses and Strengths

It is important to assess your strengths and weaknesses and how they will affect you when it comes to competing with the established players in your local catering industry. You may bring competitive advantages to the business such as catering experience or local food and hospitality industry connections. You may also identify personal weaknesses that you can work on improving or weaknesses that your company will face when compared to your better established competitors.

9) Track Your Progress

A business plan should not be forgotten about once the catering business has launched. Refer to the plan regularly to see if you are on track to hit the goals that you set out. Make changes to the plan as you go so that you always have a plan in place for your business going forward at least two or three years.

10) Make Selling Out a Breeze

Many caterers end up selling their businesses if they retire or move on to other projects. A business plan that is up to date can really help when it comes to valuing your business for a potential sale. If your business offers a buyer a blueprint for managing the business and it offers solid proof that the business is making a profit then it could really help you to seal a deal at a favorable price.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6625385

Starting A Home Based Cookery Business – Catering For All Tastes

Impress your family & friends with the fabulous party catering Sydney. If you are a good cook and like cooking, why not build on your skills and knowledge and start your own business doing something you already know you enjoy. The first thing to do is decide what sort of cookery you want to undertake on a business basis.

Can you envisage yourself having a career running a full catering business? If so, you could choose to offer a general catering service or one specialising in organising buffet meals or wedding breakfasts only. You might want to create a niche business offering multi-course gourmet meals, vegetarian extravaganzas or ethnic feasts.

Perhaps your interest is in baking. If you can reliably produce delicious cakes and pastries, a bakery business might be more to your liking. You can make a career out of baking and decorating cakes to your own designs, you could even specialise in one type of cake eg cheesecakes or wedding cakes.

Maybe your passion is jam-making or pickling or bottling fruit. These types of homemade goods produced with fresh natural ingredients are far superior to the preservative packed factory manufactured varieties and are enjoyed by everyone who appreciates food that actually tastes like food.

Don’t overlook the possibility of running a lunch delivery service. If you live reasonably near to offices or factories, you could start a sandwich/snack delivery round. Fresh homemade sandwiches are in a different league to the bland offerings available in many commercial outlets. Workers usually only get an hour or less for lunch so they will appreciate the chance to save time and effort by having lunch delivered. As well as sandwiches, you could offer home baked pies and cakes. The sandwich round could easily be run part-time in addition to other catering jobs.

If you are already involved in cooking for your family and friends, you probably have most, if not all, the basic equipment needed to start up a catering related home business. If you intend to specialise in baking and decorating cakes or selling homemade sandwiches, your initial outlay will be comparatively small. You will obviously need to budget for ingredients. Also, you will need to buy suitable packaging materials and have funds to pay for any fuel you will use to make deliveries.

It is worth the extra expense to have items such as sandwich bags and cake boxes printed with your details so that customers will be reminded of your name (or your company name) and can recommend you to friends or phone you to place repeat orders. If your ambition is to offer a full catering service, you might find that you need an additional freezer, fridge or microwave oven. You might even find that you need a dedicated vehicle to use for your business. A business loan might be the best way to cover any large expenses.

After brainstorming the possibilities, it is time to sit down and draw up a formal business plan. This will be necessary if you intend to apply for a business development loan or seek a grant for start-up capital. Putting your plans down on paper will also help you to clarify all the details and turn a bunch of ideas into a real project.

Before you cook anything in a professional capacity, it is essential to find out what is required in your area in the way of insurances, and certification to enable you to prepare food on a commercial basis. You need to make enquiries of your local Health Authority who will provide you with the regulations and inform you what inspections are required. You don’t want your business to get closed down on a technicality, so make sure you do your homework on rules and regulations in advance.

Whatever size or type of catering business you are planning, you will need to set aside a budget for advertising. As in most lines of business, the best way to grow a catering business is through personal recommendation but this takes time and you have to have some customers to start spreading the word in the first place. You must advertise to get started and to keep your business growing. Advertising can consist of many different things, eg having fliers delivered, press releases and classified advertisements in local newspapers, classified advertisements in targeted magazines. Have stationery and business cards printed with your business details, post advertisements free on notice boards in shops.

Make sure you tell everyone about your new business. This includes friends and acquaintances who can spread the word but you should also make contact with people in related businesses to see if you can make a mutual recommendation agreement. For example, if your speciality is baking wedding cakes, it would be useful to form an alliance with the local florist, local dressmaker and (obviously) any local wedding planner.

Take a short business course on the Internet or at your local college. Even if you intend to employ an accountant or have a qualified advisor, you should know at least the basics of business management and your tax liabilities.

Finally, make sure you give yourself a continuing education on all food-related subjects. Subscribe to professional magazines and take evening classes to learn new techniques and recipes. Trends in food change and you need to keep up to date with those trends as well as learning about new discoveries relating to nutrition.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/242715